News

  • Home
  • Media
  • News
  • Evaluating the KANPE program

Evaluating the KANPE program

December 20, 2012

Professor Stéphane Brutus is a member of the Board of KANPE. In late November, along with a fellow member of KANPE’s volunteer committee, Cynthia Philip, he went to Baille Tourible as an observer to assess the impact of KANPE’s integrated programme. He tells us his experience below.

What was your mandate on this trip to Baille Tourible?

Le The evaluation mandate is quite simple: to do a systematic analysis of KANPE’s achievements in Baille Tourible and, if appropriate, make recommendations for the future. To do this, we conducted a dozen interviews with various stakeholders in the field (coaches, coordinators, medical staff, etc.). We also conducted two focus groups and visited several program participants, along with companions. The medical records of 315 participants and their accompanying records were also recorded by the team. It was quite a busy week!


Why assess KANPE’s integrated programming at this particular stage?

Our intervention in Baille Tourible is nearing completion and participating families will graduate in March (editor’s note: a ceremony is scheduled for March 9, 2013 marking the end of support for program participants, which lasted 18 months). The time is right for a closer look at the achievements of the program.

What are the next steps once the evaluation is completed?

The report will be submitted to the Board in January 2013. In addition to a thorough analysis of the process and results of the program, the report will include a list of recommendations that will optimize KANPE’s future initiatives. The Board could choose to take action on the recommendations, if deemed appropriate.


What has stayed with you from your trip to Baille Tourible after working with families supported by KANPE’s programme?

What struck me the most is the hard work displayed by the women participating in the program as well as the coaches. For these women, work is survival and, with the help of KANPE, means access to a better life. The day of a typical householder KANPE is filled with a series of challenging tasks and each is critical to the livelihood of her family. Apart from Sunday Mass, during which they can relax a bit, these women have very little respite. Regarding the seven companions, I challenge anyone to follow a single day! The physical, emotional, and psychological burden of their work has nothing in common with the concept of "work" as we know it. These young men are truly extraordinary and have all my admiration.





Top Of Page